Milk, Money, and Madness
                 by Naomi Baumslag, Dia L. Michels, Richard Jolly
                           Our Price: $26.95
 

                 Hardcover - 288 pages (November 1995)
                 Bergin & Garvey; ISBN: 0897894073 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.11 x 9.61 x 6.52
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                 Amazon.com Sales Rank: 87,697
                 Avg. Customer Review:
                 Number of Reviews: 4

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                 Reviews
                 From Booklist , November 1, 1995
                 There's nothing wishy-washy about the authors' attitude about
                 breast-feeding versus bottle-feeding: they marshal a range of medical,
                 economic, cultural, and psychological arguments for the proposition that
                 "all infants would be better off if they were to receive some breastmilk,"
                 and maintain that, while infant "formula" can save lives in a limited number
                 of specific medical situations, its routine use has highly negative
                 public-health consequences in both industrialized nations and
                 less-developed countries. Baumslag, a clinical pediatrics professor at
                 Georgetown University's medical school, and science writer Michels focus
                 on "why to" (rather than "how to" ) breast-feed in an effort to overcome
                 what UNICEF acting executive director Dr. Richard Jolly calls in a
                 foreword the "myths and misinformation" that cloud women's understanding
                 of the issue. The authors survey the history of breast-feeding and its
                 substitutes in a variety of cultures; explain the nutritional and
                 immunological differences between breast milk and various infant
                 "formulas" ; and examine the issue's economics, including the roles of
                 formula manufacturers, governments, and employers of working mothers in
                 the U.S. and around the world. A thorough analysis; includes tables, charts,
                 and appendixes. Mary Carroll
                 Copyright© 1995, American Library Association. All rights reserved

                 Choice
                 "With well-founded indignation, Baumslag and Michels describe a medical,
                 political, economic, and historical background that has deprived too many
                 infants of their nutritional birthright. Breastfeeding should need no
                 defense....Yet a combination of forces, including sexism that distorts the
                 breast's functional role and corporate greed that promotes artificial feeding
                 in developing nations, has created a public health problem in which infants
                 die unnecessariuly for lack of breast milk."

                 Book Description
                 "I commend the authors of Milk, Money, and Madness for the considerable
                 contribution they have made by voicing their opinions, contributing their
                 knowledge, stimulating debate and challenging conventional wisdom."
                 Dr. Richard Jolly, Acting Executive Director
                 UNICEF
                 Breastfeeding is a beautiful process. It involves the participation of both
                 mother and child and cannot be duplicated by a glass bottle and rubber
                 nipple. So why does the United States have the lowest breastfeeding rate in
                 the industrialized world? In Milk, Money and Madness, Baumslag and
                 Michels examine the issue of breastfeeding, clearly drawing a line between
                 fact and fiction. Among the main points addressed are:
                 o How U.S. taxpayers unwittingly support and encourage bottle-feeding by
                 spending over $500 million each year to provide 37% of the infants in the
                 U.S. with free formula.
                 o How a product created to help sick children and foundlings was
                 transformed into a powerful international industry with revenues of $22
                 million a day.
                 o How an intimate and self-affirming life experience that is responsible for
                 the survival of our species has been reduced to "just one feeding option."
                 Milk, Money, and Madness provides parents and health professionals with
                 the information they need to fully appreciate and advise about this critical
                 life choice. By reviewing the history, culture, biology, and politics of
                 breastfeeding, Milk, Money, and Madness gives the reader a more complete
                 understanding of the uniqueness of breastfeeding.

                 From the Publisher
                 "With well-founded indignation, Baumslag and Michels describe a medical,
                 political, economic, and historical background that has deprived too many
                 infants of their nutritional birthright. Breastfeeding should need no
                 defense....Yet a combination of forces, including sexism that distorts the
                 breast's functional role and corporate greed that promotes artificial feeding
                 in developing nations, has created a public health problem in which infants
                 die unnecessariuly for lack of breast milk." Choice

                                                      Click here for all reviews...
 

                 Customer Comments
                 Average Customer Review:  Number of Reviews: 4

                 criikonen@ceralyte.com from Columbia, MD , February 19, 1998
 
                 Another great Baumslag contribution to babes and moms alike!
                 Baumslag has done an excellent job again to help promote the ways and
                 whys of breastfeeding, to help health professionals, potential breastfeeders,
                 and, most importantly, the little ones who stand to benefit most.

                 A shopper , July 2, 1997
                 A must to help encourage breastfeeding.
                 Dr. Baumslag took a historical approach towards
                 the subject of breastfeeding. It was very
                 interesting to find out about other cultures'
                 approaches to something so natural as
                 breastfeeding when the American culture has
                 diminished it to being one of two possible
                 infant foods.

                 I had gone to the public library to find books on
                 breastfeeding and had found only two in their
                 catalog. Thankfully, this was one of them! I
                 checked the book out twice and now plan to
                 purchase a copy to help encourage my daughter
                 to breastfeed when she has children.
                 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

                 A reader , April 22, 1997
                 provocative book
                 This book is very inspiring as well as being very well researched. It is the
                 perfect follow-up to Gabrielle Palmer's Politics of Breastfeeding. It
                 documents the continued violations of the World Health Organization's
                 Code for the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes by formula companies
                 while describing the history of infant feeding practises around the world. A
                 very provocative read.

                 A reader , April 8, 1997
                 Dia Micheals has her data down pat
                 This is very well researched and should inspire anyone to believe that
                 breastmilk is the only way to feed a baby. After reading this book, anyone
                 will become a staunch breastfeeding advocate and will cringe to see a
                 bottle in a baby's mouth, diaper bag, or a formula ad appearing anywhere. I
                 love the information on how respectfully women are treated around the
                 world, expected to nurse and nurture their babies- and then contrast that
                 with how poorly the US society treats women. still! Six weeks isnt' long
                 enough for moms and new babies and Dia points out the wonderful ways
                 that the rest of the industrialised world copes with the reality of nurturing
                 the next generation.

rom The Publisher:
                  Breastfeeding is a beautiful process. It involves the participation of both
                  mother and child and cannot be duplicated by a glass bottle and rubber
                  nipple. So why does the United States have the lowest breastfeeding rate
                  in the industrialized world? In Milk, Money and Madness, Baumslag and
                  Michels examine the issue of breastfeeding, clearly drawing a line
                  between fact and fiction. Among the main points addressed are how U.S.
                  taxpayers unwittingly support and encourage bottle-feeding by spending
                  over $500 million each year to provide 37% of the infants in the U.S. with
                  free formula; how a product created to help sick children and foundlings
                  was transformed into a powerful international industry with revenues of
                  $22 million a day; and how an intimate and self-affirming life experience
                  that is responsible for the survival of our species has been reduced to "just
                  one feeding option." Milk, Money, and Madness provides parents and
                  health professionals with the information they need to fully appreciate and
                  advise about this critical life choice. By reviewing the history, culture,
                  biology, and politics of breastfeeding, Milk, Money, and Madness gives
                  the reader a more complete understanding of the uniqueness of
                  breastfeeding.
 
                  From Mary Carroll - BookList:
                  There's nothing wishy-washy about the authors' attitude about
                  breast-feeding versus bottle-feeding: they marshal a range of medical,
                  economic, cultural, and psychological arguments for the proposition that
                  "all infants would be better off if they were to receive some breastmilk,"
                  and maintain that, while infant "formula" can save lives in a limited
                  number of specific medical situations, its routine use has highly negative
                  public-health consequences in both industrialized nations and
                  less-developed countries. Baumslag, a clinical pediatrics professor at
                  Georgetown University's medical school, and science writer Michels
                  focus on "why to" (rather than "how to" ) breast-feed in an effort to
                  overcome what UNICEF acting executive director Dr. Richard Jolly calls
                  in a foreword the "myths and misinformation" that cloud women's
                  understanding of the issue. The authors survey the history of breast-feeding
                  and its substitutes in a variety of cultures; explain the nutritional and
                  immunological differences between breast milk and various infant
                  "formulas" ; and examine the issue's economics, including the roles of
                  formula manufacturers, governments, and employers of working mothers in
                  the U.S. and around the world. A thorough analysis; includes tables,
                  charts, and appendixes.
 
                  From J.P. Brickman - Choice:
                  With well-founded indignation, Baumslag and Michels describe a
                  medical, political, economic, and historical background that has deprived
                  too many infants of their nutritional birthright. Breastfeeding should need
                  no defense. . .. Yet a combination of forces, including sexism . . . and
                  corporate greed that promotes artificial feeding in developing nations, has
                  created a public health problem in which infants die unnecessarily for lack
                  of breast milk. . . . Although this book is important, it is flawed: chapters
                  repeat themes but fail to connect, sources are questionable, and some
                  supporting materials are irrelevant. Finally, hyperbolic justification for
                  breastfeeding does not serve the cause. Raises important issues.
 
                  From Library Journal:
                  The latest book by pediatrics professor Baumslag and science writer
                  Michels (A Woman's Guide to Yeast Infections, Pocket Bks., 1992) is not
                  intended as a "how-to" manual but rather as an analysis of the medical,
                  historical, social, economic, and political issues surrounding
                  breastfeeding. It includes a lengthy discussion of aggressive marketing
                  tactics by infant formula manufacturers and the international efforts taken
                  to counteract these techniques. Strongly in favor of breastfeeding under
                  virtually any circumstances, the authors convincingly illustrate its medical
                  and economic benefits to mothers, infants, and the general population.
                  Useful appendixes include, among other items, a brief directory of
                  organizations involved in the promotion of breastfeeding, a summary of
                  recent legislation, and a recommended reading and resources list. With its
                  in-depth analysis of the topic, this highly readable work is a worthwhile
                  addition to public libraries and all large health sciences collections.-Tina
                  Neville, Univ. of South Florida at St. Petersburg Lib.
 
 

                  Table of Contents
                            Illustrations
                            Foreword
                            Preface
                            Acknowledgments
                            Introduction
                  1
                            Breastfeeding Customs around the World
                                                                           3
                  2
                            Wet Nursing, Surrogate Feeding, and Healing
                            Qualities of Breastmilk
                                                                          39
                  3
                            Cow's Milk Is for Cows
                                                                          67
                  4
                            Artificial Feeding
                                                                         113
                  5
                            The Global Search for Formula Sales
                                                                         147
                  6
                            Women and Work
                                                                         189
                            Appendix A. Organizations Working to Promote
                            Breastfeeding
                                                                         213
                            Appendix B. Recommended Reading and Resource
                            List
                                                                         219
                            Appendix C. U.S. Infant Formula Recalls,
                            1982-1994
                                                                         223
                            Appendix D. Boycott Information
                                                                         227
                            Appendix E. U.S. Infant Formulas: Product
                            Ownership
                                                                         231
                            Appendix F. Physician's Pledge to Protect,
                            Promote, and Support Breastfeedi